A collection of interesting things I've found.
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nevver:

Design Crush
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Statue Selfies
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Statue Selfies
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archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
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fuckyeahhardfemme:

thatonesuheirhammad:

El Barrio Bodega (series), 2013, embroidered plastic bags. Nicoletta Daríta de la Brown.

Hard femme goals
fuckyeahhardfemme:

thatonesuheirhammad:

El Barrio Bodega (series), 2013, embroidered plastic bags. Nicoletta Daríta de la Brown.

Hard femme goals
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nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
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cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
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faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
faceomat:

Face-o-mat performing at “Liste”, during Art Basel 2014
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contemporaryartdaily:

Polly Apfelbaum at Clifton Benevento
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type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
type-lover:

Plop.by Francisco Andriani
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betype:

MissPoppyDesign
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cross-connect:

Inimagini puts together a new collection of images. Light as material gives life to the process of image making. Hacked lens allow a manipulation of my surrounding. Pushing boundaries of a digital camera in order to obtain new states.
cross-connect:

Inimagini puts together a new collection of images. Light as material gives life to the process of image making. Hacked lens allow a manipulation of my surrounding. Pushing boundaries of a digital camera in order to obtain new states.
cross-connect:

Inimagini puts together a new collection of images. Light as material gives life to the process of image making. Hacked lens allow a manipulation of my surrounding. Pushing boundaries of a digital camera in order to obtain new states.
cross-connect:

Inimagini puts together a new collection of images. Light as material gives life to the process of image making. Hacked lens allow a manipulation of my surrounding. Pushing boundaries of a digital camera in order to obtain new states.
cross-connect:

Inimagini puts together a new collection of images. Light as material gives life to the process of image making. Hacked lens allow a manipulation of my surrounding. Pushing boundaries of a digital camera in order to obtain new states.
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nevver:

Animals in Moiré, Andrea Minini
nevver:

Animals in Moiré, Andrea Minini
nevver:

Animals in Moiré, Andrea Minini
nevver:

Animals in Moiré, Andrea Minini
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archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
archiemcphee:

London-based fabric artist Lucy Sparrow just opened a very unusual and utterly charming pop-up grocery store in Bethnal Green, east London. Called The Cornershop, it sells all the everyday items a person could need with one special catch: they’re all made from felt. All of the fruit, snacks, drinks, frozen dinners, chewing gum, newspapers, and even the cash register are made of soft, fuzzy felt.
Sparrow’s awesome project was funded thanks to an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign, funding from the Arts Council and a sponsorship from UK confectionery manufacturer Swizzels Matlow. Work on the shop began in January 2014. Sparrow spent seven months painstakingly stitching together 3,944 felt items. By the time the work was finished she’d made over 250,000 stitches.

"I’ve always made big things. I like coming up with huge projects where the result is bigger than me and it takes over my life. I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?’ I like getting up at the crack of dawn and beavering away at something, knowing that so many other people are still asleep.
The felt shop was born out of a desire to make an exhibition that was so all-encompassing that when everyone came in they were just blown away by the extent of the work, the labour involved.”

Lucy Sparrow’s stitched cornershop will be open throughout August. All of her felt shop products are available for purchase with prices ranging from £3 ($5 US) for a cigarette lighter to £840 ($1420 US) for the store’s cash register (the most expensive item in the shop).
Don’t worry if you can’t make it to London to check out The Cornershop in person. You can still visit the shop to peruse and even purchase its products via The Cornershop website.
Photos by Rosie Hallam
[via Telegraph.co.uk and Dailmail.co.uk]
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