A collection of interesting things I've found.
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wowgreat:

(via Randy Grskovic - BOOOOOOOM! - CREATE * INSPIRE * COMMUNITY * ART * DESIGN * MUSIC * FILM * PHOTO * PROJECTS)
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booooooom:

Incredible timeslice photography by Dan Marker-Moore.
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ummhello:

Pantone (via nevver)
ummhello:

Pantone (via nevver)
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type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
type-lover:

overlap Bookby Ildikó & Éva Valicsek
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cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

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cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

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cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
cross-connect:

The Perfect Geometry of Robert Wechsler’s Coin Sculptures
" Money "  An assortment of geometric forms made from coins notched and joined together. Commissioned by The New Yorker for the SPOTS series in the October 14th 2013 money themed issue

                                                    &
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cross-connect:

reblog via septagonstudios:

Danny Ivan
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archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Plenty of people know how to crochet and knit, but how many of them do it underwater? Polish yarn-bombing artist Olek (previously featured here) recently undertook an awesome new artistic adventure in the Caribbeans creating an installation in the waters off Isla Mujeres, Mexico off the coast of Cancun, home to a large population of whale sharks. To voice her concern about the ongoing decline of the global shark population, Olek used her signature vibrant camouflage-patterned crochet to cover two sculptures in Isla Mujeres’ underwater musuem, Museo Subacuatico de Arte (MUSA).

The MUSA is an underwater sculpture park created to encourage the natural growth of coral reefs and has been open to the public since 2010 (though scuba diving skills are a must to be able to go see it).
For the project, Olek used safe, biodegradable materials and colors that mimic the reds, yellows and browns of the coral reef. The artist was inspired by a quote from Jason DeCaires Taylor, the original sculptor of the pieces in the MUSA, comparing the global oceans’ health to a ticking time bomb as ecosystems decline from overfishing and pollution. She specifically chose to crochet the bomb sculptures as a symbol of solidarity and call for environmental protection.

After finishing the installation Olek collaborated with Tre Packard of Pangeaseed on a stunning underwater photo shoot of divers wearing crocheted mermaid tails, bodysuits and butterfly wings.
Visit Hi-Fructose for additional images.
[via Hi-Fructose]
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liferuin:

Christian BorgerA New York Sketch, 2014
liferuin:

Christian BorgerA New York Sketch, 2014
liferuin:

Christian BorgerA New York Sketch, 2014
liferuin:

Christian BorgerA New York Sketch, 2014
liferuin:

Christian BorgerA New York Sketch, 2014
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nevver:

Design Crush
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nevver:

Statue Selfies
nevver:

Statue Selfies
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archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
archiemcphee:

Today the Department of Miniature Marvels explores the work of Australian artist Kendal Murray, who uses every day objects as the foundation for creating playful miniature mixed-media sculptures. She builds tiny, vibrant scenes that take place inside and atop found objects such as makeup compacts, coin purses, bottles, jars, and teapots. The human figures that Murray uses in her pieces are so very wee that she uses tweezers to dip in the in glue before delicately placing them into the dreamlike narrative scenes.

The artist says, “The idea of creating these miniature works came from dream states and how we are able to play with our own identity, to play with different roles we take on in our dream state. So the miniature works serve as a metaphor for intuitive thoughts.”

Visit the Arthouse Gallery website to view more of Kendal Murray’s whimsical miniature scenes.
[via DeMilked, Arthouse Gallery and My Modern Metropolis]
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fuckyeahhardfemme:

thatonesuheirhammad:

El Barrio Bodega (series), 2013, embroidered plastic bags. Nicoletta Daríta de la Brown.

Hard femme goals
fuckyeahhardfemme:

thatonesuheirhammad:

El Barrio Bodega (series), 2013, embroidered plastic bags. Nicoletta Daríta de la Brown.

Hard femme goals
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nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
nevver:

Office Safari
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cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)
cross-connect:

Georges Rousse is a world-renowned French artist and photographer born 1947 in Paris, where he currently lives and works.

Georges Rousse is unmistakably a photographer: his photographs are intrinsic to revealing his images, and deciding the composition, cropping and lighting and clicking the shutter are all essential to his process. But he is simultaneously a painter, sculptor, and architect, carrying out the same relationship to his worksites as a painter to his canvas, or a sculptor to his clay or marble.His raw material is Space: the space of deserted buildings. Taking his inspiration from a site’s architectonic quality and the light he finds there, he quickly chooses a “fragment” and creates a mise-en-scène, keeping in mind his ultimate goal, creating a photographic image. In these empty spaces, Georges Rousse constructs a kind of utopia that projects his vision of the world—his imaginary “universe.”

:)